Second Pinch Point (#8 of 12 Sentences)

#8 Second Pinch Point

#8 of only 12 sentences you need to define your entire novel.

Midway through the Attack comes the Second Pinch Point, where we share another glimpse into the evil of our antagonist. Just like during Response as our hero was flailing and failing, reveal another vivid first-hand look at what our hero is up against. As before, simple and direct is best.

Write one sentence describing this clear look into the antagonist’s actions and how it raises the stakes for our hero.

Tomorrow, #9: the All is Lost Moment.

My Pathfinding Session for fiction authors will dredge up these 12 sentences from the secret place they’re hiding in the back of your mind. It’s $1,000 worth of writing coaching for only $325. Follow this link to read about it and sign up.

Attack (#7 of 12 Sentences)

#7 Attack

#7 of only 12 sentences you need to define your entire novel.

Based on the new information introduced at the Midpoint, the hero shifts from wanderer, reacting uselessly, to warrior, attacking the problem head on.

The magnitude of this shift reminds us how significant the Midpoint is. A weak Midpoint makes the Attack less believable.

… more … “Attack (#7 of 12 Sentences)”

The Midpoint (#6 of 12 Sentences)

#6 Midpoint

#6 of only 12 sentences you need to define your entire novel.

If your novel were a play, the Setup would be Act I. Act II would be split in two: Response and Attack. In Response we saw the hero flail and fail. In Attack, they’re no longer reacting to what’s done to them, to circumstances. Instead, they’ll become a driver for the action, attacking the problem head on. They’re no longer an aimless wanderer.

The event which changes all that is the Midpoint.

… more … “The Midpoint (#6 of 12 Sentences)”

First Pinch Point (#5 of 12 Sentences)

#5 First Pinch Point

#5 of only 12 sentences you need to define your entire novel.

Midway through the flailing and failing of the Response is the First Pinch Point: the reader is given direct insight into the antagonistic forces for themselves. New information emphasizes, even raises the stakes. According to Larry Brooks, the simpler and more direct it is, the more effective it is.

Write one sentence which describes what new insight into the antagonist will raise the stakes, at least in the reader’s mind.

Tomorrow, #6: The Midpoint.

My Pathfinding Session for fiction authors will dredge up these 12 sentences from the secret place they’re hiding in the back of your mind. It’s $1,000 worth of writing coaching for only $325. Follow this link to read about it and sign up.

Response (#4 of 12 Sentences)

#4 Response

#4 of only 12 sentences you need to define your entire novel.

After the First Plot Point the hero reacts without success. For the next 25% of your book, they flounder, fight, and fail, reacting to this unwanted quest which has been thrust upon them. They are a wanderer, trying to make sense of the new world they find themselves in.

Write one (perhaps long and rambling) sentence which describes how your hero will flail and fail.

Tomorrow, #5: the First Pinch Point.

My Pathfinding Session for fiction authors will dredge up these 12 sentences from the secret place they’re hiding in the back of your mind. It’s $1,000 worth of writing coaching for only $325. Follow this link to read about it and sign up.