Updates, Tidying, and Lower Prices

little-boxesAs I approach post #400 (this is #398) I thought it time for a few changes.

As I focus more and more on writing fiction, I’m doing less and less free coaching and publishing support. Gone, sad to say, are the days of everything I know is free, all you have to do is ask. Busier writing means I need to make every minute count.

Here are a few of the changes, with a great big ask down below.

… more … “Updates, Tidying, and Lower Prices”

Editing: Finding the Right Words

dripping red inkWe need new words for all the things we mean when we say the word “editing.”

Proofreading is a separate word for a separate process and yet I’ve seen the word editing used where the writer clearly means finding and correcting spelling, grammar, and punctuation errors. Let’s all agree not to call that editing. It is proofreading.

Professional editors may divide editing into even finer gradations, but I practice two: line editing and developmental editing.

A line editor ensures that each word is the right word, that each sentence says what you mean, the best it can be said. They make sure that each paragraph is properly constructed. And they do it all without stripping your voice from your writing or overlaying theirs.

A developmental editor looks at the big picture. Their job is to determine if the book as a whole is a whole. Are there sections or chapters missing? Does everything happen in the right order? (This applies to both fiction and nonfiction.) Is there extraneous material?

A developmental editor will tell you if your novel contains the 12 essential waypoints in storytelling. They will tell you if your business book clearly teaches the points you’re trying to convey in the most effective manner. The developmental editor’s job is to determine in the broadest perspective whether or not your book works. Then, in either case, to offer suggestions and refinements to make it the best version of your intent. … more … “Editing: Finding the Right Words”