The Language of Young Adult Fiction (Guest Post by Cheryl Campbell)

Say hello again to Cheryl Campbell, YA author with an unusual perspective I admire.

Burnt Mountain The Monster Within was born from an idea that I wanted to try to write a story that my niece (at the time 5 years old) and nephew (at the time 3 years old) might enjoy as teenagers. I figured this would give me plenty of time to come up with something, and plenty of time to figure out how to get it done. I had never written a book before and had zero clue about how to do it. So I sat down, jotted some notes, typed a few pages, and kept chipping away at it. Many revisions later it started to take on some shape.

As I kept going, the shape became more recognizable as a story. I was watching movies and reading a lot to figure out what made the stories that I loved so great. Lord of the Rings, both the books and the movies were key factors in my research. Star Wars also ranked at the top. What I loved so much about them was the way they crossed all age groups. Anyone, any age could get in to see Star Wars. No profanity. No sex. No graphic violence. Both franchises had movies with some violence, but none of them were rated R.

… more … “The Language of Young Adult Fiction (Guest Post by Cheryl Campbell)”

Stop Stopping Yourself with Premature Edits (Guest Post by Rosanne Bane)

Please welcome Rosanne Bane, author and writing coach and one smart cookie. Since I’m not here to beat this drum she’s gonna do it for me.

Trying to edit while drafting is like trying to polish your shoes while walking. Actually, it’s more like trying to polish your shoes while trailblazing over rough and unmapped territory. It takes longer to get where you’re going, you can’t possibly get a good shine and you’re almost guaranteed to lose your balance and fall.

photo http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1110158 by Michal Zacharzewski http://www.sxc.hu/profile/mzacha

“Short Cuts Make Long Delays” – J.R. Tolkien

Your brain stem and limbic system can do more than one thing at a time, which is why you can walk and chew gum and still notice cars in the crosswalk. But your cortex, your creative brain, simply cannot multitask.

… more … “Stop Stopping Yourself with Premature Edits (Guest Post by Rosanne Bane)”

Housesitters for the Blog

photo http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1426694 by Bas van den Eijkhof http://www.sxc.hu/profile/mistermastToday’s my last post until the new year.

But you didn’t really think I could just ride off into the sunset without leaving a trusted deputy to take care of law and order while I’m out of town, did you? A whole team of ’em, in fact.

Watch for some guest posts here and there throughout my 3 week sabbatical.

No schedule. No warning. Serendipity.

Be kind to them. Comment, even a little more than y’all kindly do for me.

The Future of (Your) Publishing – Guest Post by John Work

The Canal by John WorkJohn Work is an author. He posted this on a Linked In group and graciously gave permission for me to reprint it here. Emphasis throughout is mine.

I’m a self-published author, both in ebook and paperback print formats. I’ve been a member of this [Linked In] group for about a year. I’ve noticed that authors who are already traditionally published frequently tell writers who are considering self-publishing their works that traditional publishing is the only way to go – and that if the aspiring writer just sticks with it, sends enough quality manuscripts to agents or publishers, and keeps at it for five, ten or twenty years, that elusive contract offer will eventually come along. You just have to persist, or so I’ve read.

Balderdash.
… more … “The Future of (Your) Publishing – Guest Post by John Work”