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Expectations

Just saying “no” to peer pressure.

I might look kind of funny compared to you
And I don’t do the kinds of things you do
But just ’cause we’re diff’rent doesn’t make it right
To tell me I’m wrong and try to start a fight

chorus
I don’t have to live down to your expectations
Not gonna be what you want me to be
Go ahead and say what you have to say
‘Cause I don’t really care what you think of me

What “everyone” does isn’t always best
You don’t have to go along with the rest
To go it alone might be a bitter pill
But I think for myself and I always will

chorus
I don’t have to live down to your expectations
Not gonna be what you want me to be
Go ahead and say what you have to say
‘Cause I don’t really care what you think of me

bridge
I’m not alone
Lots of other people feel the way I do
I’m not a clone
I won’t live a lie to make peace with you

chorus
I don’t have to live down to your expectations
Not gonna be what you want me to be
Go ahead and say what you have to say
‘Cause I don’t really care what you think of me


Self-Publishing: It’s Not Settling, It’s a Choice

photo http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1133804 by Sigurd Decroos http://www.cobrasoft.be/photography.aspxThough the article is too long and wandering to use in today’s newsletter, there are some salient quotes in Ether for Authors: Is It Time for Publishing to Call a Truce? Porter Anderson quotes Dr. Florian Geuppert of Hamburg-based Books on Demand. The emphasis in both quotes is mine:

We have surveyed 1,800 of our 25,0000 [sic] authors in Germany, Austria, Switzerland, Germany, and Scandinavia … About one-third of the authors we surveyed made a conscious choice against traditional publishing … We can identify three big groups. The first is the hobby authors. Then there are professional writers. And then there are the experts, who use self-publishing to share their expertise—being a coach, being a scientist, being a business person.
All of them across the groups said their reasons for self-publishing are first, creative freedom and control over their rights and content; second, it’s the ease of the process; third, it’s basically fun … and the desire to self-publish is even higher among professional writers.

One third of authors surveyed (by a print-on-demand company, we should note) made self-publishing their first choice.

Does that really mean the other two-thirds settled for something less than their real goal, traditional publishing?

A number of points come to mind:

  1. Don’t settle. If you want a traditional publishing deal, I think you’re wasting your time and effort, but if you still want it, don’t settle. You’ll never ever ship art that’s worth anything if you settle.
  2. Why do the majority of authors who end up self-publishing still consider it a second choice? Do they think they’ll make less money? Earn less fame? Have to work harder? Deliver an inferior product?
  3. Is fun the difference? Is this adventurous spirit where the split happens? Are we looking at, not business choices, but personalities?

Self-publishing is not automatically second-rate, second-class, second choice.

You can help prove this by producing a top quality book: the writing, editing, formatting, design, all of it.

I’m holding myself to a higher standard with all my books next year.

What could you do better with your books?


Sharing the Profits vs. Hiring Assistance

I'm sure there's a metaphor about paths and choice in here somewhereI’ve long been opposed to sharing profits with the traditional publishing world after an author has done all the work to build a following.

Lately I’ve been thinking there’s middle ground.
Continue reading “Sharing the Profits vs. Hiring Assistance”


Leveling Up: Thinking Less Like Poor Folk

Poverty changes how you act, in non-obvious ways.

It’s clear that the good quality screwdriver which will last a lifetime, for $6, is better than the junky screwdriver you’ll have to replace in a year for $3.

What slips past folks who’ve never lived in poverty is that if your choice includes “and the other $3 will buy flour so you can bake bread all week, otherwise, you get no bread” then you buy the cheap junk screwdriver.

And then again next year.

Multiply that by every single small purchase decision you make and you’ll quickly see that when there isn’t enough money, it can be almost impossible to escape.

image http://www.sxc.hu/photo/1426350 by gvdvarst http://www.sxc.hu/profile/gvdvarst
Continue reading “Leveling Up: Thinking Less Like Poor Folk”